Katarzyna Wojczulanis-Jakubas

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To whom mate? A big question of the little auks











Cooperators: 

Dr Magdalena-Zagalska Neubauer, Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Science, Poland

Dr Jerome Fort, Littoral Environment et Societes, La Rochelle, France
Dr Maria Gavrilo, Marine Biological Institute, Murmansk, Russia
Dr hab. Dariusz Jakubas, University of Gdańsk, Poland

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Hormonal determinants of the parental behaviour in the little auk


In this project, we are examining hormonal stress response of the little auk (corticosterone and prolactin). That should help to understand the mechanisms underlying the transition from biparental to male-only care that is observed in this species. The reasons for such two-phase parental care are poorly understood in general in birds, including little auk. It has been postulated that one of the reasons why the little auk male remains with his offspring, while female deserts could be related to his presumed aptitude for performing the final parental duty, i.e., protection against predators. Being somewhat larger and presumably also more aggressive, male little auk could be more efficient in chick protection than female. If so, he should also be less risk-averse than female and more specifically, should be less sensitive to stressors to ensure his greater commitment while protecting the young against predator. We are verifying this hypothesis examining baseline and stress-induced levels of corticosterone and prolactin using a standardized capture-and-restraint protocol (please see below detailed description of the protocol).  We aim at these two hormones as both of them have been found to change in response to stress situation. Corticosterone is known to elevate after a stressor inducing a bird to escape. Prolactin has been found to decrease in response to acute stress, and a prolonged decrease can trigger brood desertion. Therefore, changes in the corticosterone and prolactin level might provide excellent insight into the willingness and/or ability of birds to maintain parental care when circumstances are stressful. Thus, in the light of the tested hypothesis we expect that females would exhibit a stronger hormonal response to the capture-and-restraint protocol (i.e., higher and lower stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin levels, respectively) compared to the males.



Cooperators:

Prof. Dr. Olivier Chastel, Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chize, France

Dr hab. Dariusz Jakubas, University of Gdańsk, Poland

PhD Student, Monika Kulpińska, University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland

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Songs of the Arctic










Cooperators:
PhD Student, Marcelo Araya-Salas, New Mexico University, Costa Rica/USA
Dr Jerome Fort, Littoral Environment et Societes, La Rochelle,
France
Dr Maria Gavrilo, Marine Biological Institute, Murmansk, Russia
Dr Dariusz Jakubas, University of Gdańsk, Poland
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Alike but different - genetics and morphology of the two little auk subspecies










Cooperators:
Prof. Dr Vicky Friesen, Queen's Univesrity, Kingston, Canada
Dr Jerome Fort, Littoral Environment et Societes, La Rochelle, France
Dr Maria Gavrilo, Marine Biological Institute, Murmansk, Russia
Dr Dariusz Jakubas, University of Gdańsk, Poland
Dr Adrianna Kilikowska, Dept of Genetics, University of Gdańsk, Poland
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Parent-offspring vocal recognition



















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Population genetics of the great cormorant












Prof. Dr Redik Eschbaum, Marine Institute University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
Dr Maria Bostrom, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Öregrund, Sweden
Dr Robert Rutkowski, Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Science, Warsaw, Poland
Dr Piotr Minias, Department of Teacher Training and Biodiversity Studies, University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland
M.Sc Jurante Zarankaite, Universitas Vilnius, Vilnius, Lituania
Dr Adrianna Kilikowska, Dept of Genetics, University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland
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A few questions about the storm petrel

Can we one tell differences between males and females?

Is the cost of egg laying so big i?

Can the birds smell a scent of primary production in the ocean?




Cooperators:

Jens-Klejd Jensen, Nolsoy, Faroe Island
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Migration routes of Aquatic Warbler males and females















Cooperators:

Prof. Dr Frederic Jiguet, National Museum of Natural History, Paris, France

Master Student, Małgorzata Chrostek, University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland